Acres of Servers

April 13, 2009

Brian Sommer offers this astonishing story about a bad implementation. The story comes from early in his career.

“I worked an entire year getting the first mainframe General Ledger (and other vendor apps) in production at a Texas client. I have never before or since worked so many hours in one year.

After that project, I was off to another installation of the same vendor. When I arrived, I found a team that had been diligently preparing for a conversion to take place in approximately one year.

The users wanted to push this software product to the absolute extremes of its functionality. The software was going to be configured with virtually every conceivable option.

Having just lived through the Bataan death implementation, I knew there were some practical limits for this software. Within 24 hours of being on-site, I shared with the client my disk space concerns for one of the validation tables: a reverse code block look up table. By my calculation, this table alone would require 14 acres of IBM 3350 disk drives. That’s
correct:14 acres.

The client didn’t believe me.

Two weeks later, the client executive director invited me to listen in to a call he’s having with the vendor’s CEO. Everything went well until we got to the subject of the lookup table. The software CEO confirmed my math and told the client that his software was ahead of its time. He said that hardware hadn’t caught up with his software and that the client should “either scale back the functionality or do a hostile takeover of IBM”. Needless to say, that didn’t go over well with the client.

Now the client believed me.

They also believed me when I told them that the product wasn’t ready to run in IMS DB/DC. It took another 12-18 months before the technical platform was ready.”

Thanks, Brian. But one question. Who was at fault? The client? The vendor?

“Fault. It was the project team. They went along with everything the client wanted. Sometimes, in the long run, you need to show clients a little tough love.”

Oh, and one other. What is an IMS DB/DC?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: